14th July 1944

An alarm in the night, about 3 I think.  Curled up under bed and went to sleep.  Heard nothing.
Up early, roused by noise of preparations to take Wendy’s baby away to Morecambe, going cross country by Cambridge, Rugby, etc. so as to avoid London.
Warm day, with high clouds, the Langham Thunderbolts out early, going past the bedroom window in pairs.  At breakfast, suddenly realised I had forgotten to go on duty at 1am, thinking it was tonight, ie – 1am Saturday.  Felt an awful fool, and telephoned to Pawsey as soon as I could.  He took it very well, laughed, and said I could easily do that turn on another night, to relieve somebody else.

Capt. Folkard very pleasant and affable this morning, perhaps because he did not have to go to Writtle today.  Had a busy time.  Went round to the Food Office and had a lot of trouble trying to get a ration for a driver called Mills.  Quite lost my temper with the stupid fools.

Saw Hervey Benham coming out of the “Standard” Office back way as I was going back.  “Hullo”, said he “quarrelled with anybody else?”

Heavy bombers began to go out soon after tea, circling over the heads of the men working in the fields as they slowly gained height and disappeared to the south east, leaving the sky clear and quiet.  Even now the evenings are beginning to draw in a little, a few minutes each night. 

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