23rd February 1941

Went over to Dedham this afternoon, to the Belfields'. Took the pony out. She went very well, and looked really charming. Penelope [Belfield], wearing a green, long coat and a green turban, was most vivacious and lively. She drives quite well already. We went down to Dedham Street, and I called at Sisson’s, where he told me he had just been appointed in charge of bomb damage on historical buildings. We had a short discussion on this, and then I went back to Belfield’s to tea. Had a very pleasant time, but had to rush back to Colchester by 8 o’clock, to relieve Chapman at the Castle, as this is the [fire] watcher’s night off. I don’t intend to do this every Sunday.

The architect, Marshall Sisson, was working closely with the newly formed National Buildings Record, which had been appointed in 1941 to compile 'a full graphic, photographic, and other records of buildings of merit, whatever their date, which have been damaged or are in danger of damage by warfare.'

The resulting survey, amassed by the National Buildings Record, now forms part of the National Monuments Record maintained by English Heritage and is open to the public.

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